Fiax Lux

plaindress:

from the photographer’s website:

From 2006 through 2010, I traveled throughout the southeastern United States befriending, photographing, and interviewing a network of people who left cities and suburbs to live off the grid. Motivated by environmental concerns, religious beliefs, or predictions of economic collapse, my subjects build their homes from local materials, obtain their water from nearby springs, and hunt, gather, or grow their own food.  All the people in my photographs are working to maintain a self-sufficient lifestyle, but no one I found lives in complete isolation from the mainstream. Many of my subjects have websites that they update using laptop computers, and cell phones that they charge on car batteries or solar panels. They do not wholly reject the modern world. Instead, they step away from it and choose the parts that they want to bring with them.

lucas foglia, http://www.lucasfoglia.com

plaindress:

from the photographer’s website:

From 2006 through 2010, I traveled throughout the southeastern United States befriending, photographing, and interviewing a network of people who left cities and suburbs to live off the grid. Motivated by environmental concerns, religious beliefs, or predictions of economic collapse, my subjects build their homes from local materials, obtain their water from nearby springs, and hunt, gather, or grow their own food.

All the people in my photographs are working to maintain a self-sufficient lifestyle, but no one I found lives in complete isolation from the mainstream. Many of my subjects have websites that they update using laptop computers, and cell phones that they charge on car batteries or solar panels. They do not wholly reject the modern world. Instead, they step away from it and choose the parts that they want to bring with them.

lucas foglia, http://www.lucasfoglia.com

Happy Feast of Bl. John Paul II! His last one as a blessed!
The awesome graphic above is from a cool website I just found, called Happy Saint (http://www.happysaints.com/). Awesome graphics, really well written saint bios (accessible hagiography FTW) and I will fully admit that I purchased way too many of their colouring sheets to use with the kids tomorrow. Go check them out—and Bl. JPII, pray for us!

Happy Feast of Bl. John Paul II! His last one as a blessed!

The awesome graphic above is from a cool website I just found, called Happy Saint (http://www.happysaints.com/). Awesome graphics, really well written saint bios (accessible hagiography FTW) and I will fully admit that I purchased way too many of their colouring sheets to use with the kids tomorrow. Go check them out—and Bl. JPII, pray for us!

Lord have mercy on my catechesis (catechetics?) class!

Have you ever wound up in a ministry that you feel grossly underqualified for? Somehow, I’ve wound up in charge of children’s liturgy 1-2 weekends per month in my new parish (and if someone wants to talk about the theology of that sometime, I’d be more than happy to—right now I’m doing correct theology vs. pragmatics inside my own head, and it’s starting to echo). Then, this week I was put in charge of the grade two and three catechesis class at my parish, with the first assignment being to teach them about saints for 1.5 hours this Wednesday night. My first, and last, and latest thought is: Lord have mercy on those poor kids! Lord have mercy on me!

Have I ever mentioned the fact that, although I find them wonderful and mildly miraculous, kids confuse the heck out of me? I have no cousins, quit babysitting at 14 after a child tried to pee on my shoe (Hey, they were Converse sneakers!) and close enough in age to my younger brother and sister that I was seldom, if ever, put in charge of them for any considerable length of time (or, it could have been due to the fact that I enjoyed sword fighting with fireplace pokers…). Since then, I’ve mostly specialized in playing peek-a-boo with cranky toddlers in grocery store lineups…but I get the sense that by grades 2 and 3, kids are kind of past that.

Confession: I just had to Google how old grade 2/3 kids are (7-9 years).

So, given that Tumblr is hopefully full of geniuses well versed in both theology and mid-childhood education—how would you go about getting kids enthused and informed about saints? I’ve got some old parish activity books that I’m digging through—but they seem to be just barely a cut above flannel boards in terms of excitement. What can I do to compete with the Cartoon Network (Partial answer: it’s not me competing, it’s God, and he’s already got Time Warner beat…but) and give them substance at the same time? And is it rude to find it hilarious how…humbled…I am at my feelings of utter and complete ineptitude in this area? 

When God decided to give me this ministry, he sure had a sense of humour. Well, if He got me into teaching these kids (and their parents), he’s going to have to do some heavy lifting on the grace side of things. I guess that He really wants it to all come from Him, otherwise He would have picked someone better qualified. If that’s the case, I just need to get out of the way…because prepare as I might, I have no idea what I’m doing!

Well, I guess that this is a concrete illustration of St. Therese’s brilliant saying: In the evening of this life, I shall appear before You with empty hands.”

But still, dear Tumblrverse—help?

P.S. Shouldn’t parishes have training or some kind of…qualifications requirement for children’s ministry? Helping to impart the foundations of lifelong faith seems too important not to be treated as such!

The cross has no purpose of itself. It rises on high and points above. But it is not merely a sign—it is Christ’s powerful weapon; the shepherd’s staff with which the divine David moves against the hellish Goliath; with it he strikes mightily against heaven’s gate and throws it wide open. Then streams of divine light flow forth and enfold all who are followers of the Crucified.

—Edith Stein (via victoryofjustice)

Because you don’t know, or don’t want to know, how to imitate that man’s upright manner of acting, your secret envy makes you seek to ridicule him.

—St. Josemaria Escriva (via art-dianies)

We must decide. It’s wrong to have two candles lighted – one to St Michael and another to the devil. We must snuff out the devil’s candle: we must spend our life completely in the service of the Lord. If our desire for holiness is sincere, if we are docile enough to place ourselves in God’s hands, everything will go well. For he is always ready to give us his grace, especially at a time like this – grace for a new conversion, a step forward in our lives as Christians.

—St Josemaria Escriva. (via returning-the-ticket)

(via returning-theticket-deactivated)